The Great Learning

 Mana Contemporary, New Jersey, 2015 (Photo: Erin Lee Smith)

Mana Contemporary, New Jersey, 2015 (Photo: Erin Lee Smith)

 Vigeland-Museet, Oslo, 2017 (Photo: Carsten Aniksdal / Vigeland-Museet)

Vigeland-Museet, Oslo, 2017 (Photo: Carsten Aniksdal / Vigeland-Museet)

Video: Lucas McGowen

Mana Contemporary, Theorem. You Simply Destroy the Image I Always Had Of Myself , New Jersey, 2015, Curated by Octavio Zaya

Norsk Skulpturbiennale 2017 , Vigeland-Museet, Oslo, Norway, Curated by Steffen Håndlykken

A copper rod stands completely vertical in the exhibition space. It is held in its position by a series of thin microfilament strings that stretch geometrically to several points in the ceiling, and connect to industrial weights that lay on the ground. One of these weights is held down, by a simple attachment, to a rock. When the attachment is manually released, the weights begin to give way and the copper rod falls slowly in diagonal to the architecture of the space. The fall takes approximately 15 minutes, and it is the result of a meticulous balance between the weights on the ground, the weights hanging from the strings at ceiling level, the friction created by the various angles on the string, and the weight of the rod itself. 

The Great Learning is the name of one of the four books of Confucianism. In the 1970’s the British composer Cornelius Cardew wrote an ensemble piece also called The Great Learning, which was based on the book's texts. Its “Paragraph 7” includes singers borrowing their singing pitch from another singer in the group, moving slowly towards a unison.



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